What Does It Mean To Be An American?

A solemn reminder to not let history repeat itself

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In many ways February 19, 1942 shaped my life, although I would not be born for 14 more years. In 1942 my mother was an 11-year old girl in Stockton, California and although I’m not sure how well-off her family was, I’ve heard stories of them owning several cars at the time and my grandfather running a business. My father’s family was not so well-off in San Francisco. Dad was not yet 14 and their family of six, like many immigrant families, was struggling. My grandfather and grandmother were working menial jobs that did not require English fluency. …


Using shared experiences to teach the power of identity

By Dianne Fukami

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When I was younger, I longed to visit Japan, the country from where all four grandparents emigrated. It didn’t matter that my father had never been there or that I didn’t speak the language at all. But for once in my life I wanted to look like everyone else and fit in. Even in San Francisco, I felt “different” and during our youthful years, there is nothing more important than fitting in.

I got my wish when I was in my 20s, assigned to go to Japan on a two-week work assignment. You can imagine my shock…

What Does It Mean To Be An American?

A powerful learning tool, designed to enable & enlighten the 21st century student. Developed by the Mineta legacy Project in partnership with Stanford SPICE.

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